Chonky Boys: The Chocolate Chip Cookie Ice Cream Sandwiches that Scream Summer!

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Featuring my thick and nuggy Chonky Boy Chocolate Chip Cookies, these ice cream sandwiches are the stuff that summer dreams are made of.  If you've ever had the Cookie Ice Cream Sandwich at Disneyland , you are going to LOVE these! 

These big and bold chocolate chip cookies are based on a recipe from my culinary school studies at Auguste Escoffier, but with a few modifications to give them that Jennuine touch.  They make the perfectas book for a fat slice of real vanilla bean ice cream.  And those mini chips?  You just gotta have that extra cronch!

Thank goodness this recipe only makes 8 sandwiches, otherwise I would be eating them for breakfast lunch and dinner.  This way, my big family can help save me from my inner child diet-saboteur.  
PrintWith ImageWithout Image Chonky Boy Chocolate Chip Cookie Ice Cream SandwichesYield: 8Author: Jenn Erickson Loaded with chocolate chips and buttery, brown-sugary vanilla flavor, these mall-sized cookies form a perfect partnership with a fat wedg…

What To Do With Left Over Easter Eggs: Make Spring Garden Deviled Eggs {RECIPE}


Do you love Deviled Eggs?  Whether you're looking for a way to use up hard-boiled eggs after Easter, or want a simple, natural way to add color, flavor and beauty to this classic appetizer, this is a recipe you should try or pin for later.


Inspired by a project done by one of my advanced culinary students (Sofia Moore, class of 2020) for an art gallery show last year, these hard-boiled eggs get their color from beets.  The eggs are not pickled, but rather bathed in the beet water to take on the color without affecting the flavor balance.



I love decorating with edible flowers.  On the central California coast, where I live, there are an abundance of local blossoms that grow wild in yards and green areas at this time of year.  Pictured below are some of my favorites that can be foraged in April.

The large flowers, Nasturtium, have a peppery flavor and are delicious, but I'm saving them for a different recipe.

Pictured below from left to right:  Chickweed (leaves and tiny white blossoms are edible and taste like lettuce),  Three-cornered leek blossoms (tastes like chives), Wild geranium blossoms (slightly peppery), Wild Sweet Peas & shoots (a very light sweet pea flavor).


Foraging etiquette and safety:  When foraging for wild edibles, keep in mind that you should not forage on private property.  Pick only what you need and can identify.  Do not rip out the roots of the plant.  Do not forage in an area frequented by animals or where pesticides are used.  Wash all foraged items before use.




Spring Garden Deviled Eggs

Spring Garden Deviled Eggs

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Prep time: Cook time: Total time:
This is a beautiful and delicious way to dress-up traditional deviled eggs. The eggs get a lovely magenta hue from beets, but are not pickled, so the delicate flavor balance isn't compromised. The eggs are garnished with edible spring flowers.

Ingredients:

  • Large or Extra Large eggs (quantity is up to you)
  • 1 large fresh beet, peeled an diced
  • White vinegar (just a splash or two)
  • For the filling: (all to taste) mayonnaise, mustard, cayenne, a pinch of sugar, salt, pepper and a splash of pickle juice
  • Edible flowers for garnish

Instructions:

  1. Place your eggs in a large pot and cover with cold water. Add the diced fresh beet. (If your eggs are already hard-boiled, just add the beets to about 8 cups of water in a large pot. Leave the eggs aside).
  2. Over high heat, bring the eggs & beets (or just the beets) to a boil. Once boiling, set timer for 10 minutes. In the meantime, prepare a large bowl of ice & cold water (ice bath) and set aside.
  3. After 10 minutes, turn off the heat. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the eggs directly to the ice bath to cool. The beets can remain in the water. Do not drain the water -- this is your color bath.
  4. When the eggs have cooled, peel and set aside.
  5. When the color bath has cooled, transfer to a container and add a splash or two of white vinegar. Add the eggs (if you're using Easter eggs, this is when you should add the peeled eggs to the beet liquid). The beets should remain in the liquid also. Refrigerate overnight.
  6. When ready to make the deviled eggs, remove the cooked beets to a jar with enough of the liquid to cover them. These will keep in the refrigerator for about a week and can be eaten with a salad or however you'd like.
  7. Make deviled eggs. Feel free to use your own recipe. For mine, I cut the colored eggs in half and scooped the yolks into a bowl. I added mayonnaise, mustard, a pinch of sugar, salt, white pepper, and cayenne pepper to taste. My secret ingredient is a splash of pickle juice from the dill pickle jar. I whip my yolks and the other ingredients with an electric mixer until they are exceptionally light and fluffy. Taste, adjust, then fill the eggs. I piped mine using a pastry bag and open French star tip.
  8. Decorate -- Now you get to be an artist with your tiny blossoms, leaves and shoots. Tweezers help here.  
  9. Refrigerate until ready to eat.

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Step 1:  Place your eggs in a large pot and cover with cold water.  Add the diced fresh beet.  (If your eggs are already hard-boiled, just add the beets to about 8 cups of water in a large pot.  Leave the eggs aside).  

Step 2:  Over high heat, bring the eggs & beets (or just the beets) to a boil.  Once boiling, set timer for 10 minutes.  In the meantime, prepare a large bowl of ice & cold water  (ice bath) and set aside.

Step 3:  After 10 minutes, turn off the heat.  Use a slotted spoon to transfer the eggs directly to the ice bath to cool.  The beets can remain in the water.  Do not drain the water -- this is your color bath.

Step 4:  When the eggs have cooled, peel and set aside.

Step 5:  When the color bath has cooled, transfer to a container and add a splash or two of white vinegar.  Add the eggs (if you're using Easter eggs, this is when you should add the peeled eggs to the beet liquid).  The beets should remain in the liquid also.  Refrigerate overnight.

Step 6:  When ready to make the deviled eggs, remove the cooked beets to a jar with enough of the liquid to cover them.  These will keep in the refrigerator for about a week and can be eaten with a salad or however you'd like.

Step 7:  Make deviled eggs.  Feel free to use your own recipe.  For mine, I cut the colored eggs in half and scooped the yolks into a bowl.  I added mayonnaise, mustard, a pinch of sugar, salt, white pepper, and cayenne pepper to taste.  My secret ingredient is a splash of pickle juice from the dill pickle jar.  I whip my yolks and the other ingredients with an electric mixer until they are exceptionally light and fluffy.  Taste, adjust, then fill the eggs.  I piped mine using a pastry bag and open French star tip.

Step 8:  Decorate -- Now you get to be an artist with your tiny blossoms, leaves and shoots.  Tweezers help here.  


How do they taste?  That's up to you.  If you balanced your flavors right, you should have an amazing looking and tasting deviled egg.  But what about the flowers?  The flowers should be used sparingly, should be fresh, and should add just a subtle little something to a perfectly prepared deviled egg.


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